Wednesday, January 13, 2010

I was in despair of this piece…

 

o fortuna

d’you ever get like that?  Everything seemed to go wrong, but finally it has come together and it looks pretty nice I think.  I’ve got the depth I was after and the many layers of meaning of this kind of image.   It’s not very large: 27” by 40” .  I’d love to do it much bigger, but I’ll cogitate upon that for a while!!!

This is the 9th or 10th piece in the industrial series I’ve been working on for a year or so now…see more on my website and the second one I’ve done based on a colliery.  It’s not so long that these big winding wheels were a common site in Yorkshire (where I’m originally from) and Durham, where my grandfather was a miner.  A giant, ominous wheel of fortune…if all went well there was a good wage and free coal, if not…a terrible loss.

Phew!!  thank goodness it’s ready for the photographer!
any comments (positive or negative one can learn from both!) gratefully accepted.

And , if you have been, thanks for reading!  I’m off for a walk now while the sun is shining!
Elizabeth

4 comments:

Michigoose said...

I love it! I like the vertical lines with the circular wheels and the houses in the background. Your color choice I think was masterful as it is really unexpected.

Vivien said...

I like it very much. The use of your foliage fabric in the interior is a nice surprise and the radiating spokes of stitching give the piece nice motion to give life to the big wheel. I agree with Michigoose that this color palette is unexpected. It's so different than other works of yours; however, it melds well with the foliage fabric and makes for an interesting conversation between the "urban" language of your piece and the "landscape" side.

Nellie's Needles said...

Intriguing! At first glance it's all about those bold, ghostly, complex shapes. And then I'm drawn to the spot of complementary green and begin to see so much more. Wonderful!

Jackie said...

Lovely! and an excellent example of variety of values instead of only one, for example on the 'legs' of the apparatus. Thank you for sharing it!